How to: Replace Broken Tile

May 13, 2011 at 12:00 pm 2 comments

Cracks in the tile are generally caused by the building settling, but can also be due to improper tile installation, the wrong kind of tile being used, or accidents. Whatever the reason, broken tiles are generally considered unsightly, and can even lead to more serious problems if moisture happens to get into and under the cracks.

Obviously, in most cases, you won’t want to replace the entire floor due to one or two broken tiles. Here is how to remove and replace the broken tiles easily.

Materials:

• Replacement tile
• Tile adhesive
• Grout
• Water

Tools:

• Grout Scraper
• Hammer
• Pry bar
• Safety glasses
• Trowel
• Grout float
• Sponge
• Small bucket
• Filling knife

  1. Scrape the Grout
     Working around the tile joints (seams), scratch out the grout using the grout scraper. You’ll be getting a pretty fine mess going, but you need to get as much of the grout out as possible. This will separate the broken tile(s) from the ones that are not broken and will make it easier to get a pry bar under the edges if necessary later on.
  2. Break/Loosen the Tile
    With the hammer, hit the tile a couple of times to loosen it from the surface it is adhered to. Depending on the size of the tile, you will probably have to remove it in chunks. Once you’ve broken it up, use the other side of the hammer or the pry bar to lift up the tile pieces.
  3. Scrape Adhesive
    Once you’ve gotten as much of the tile as possible removed, you need to get rid of the old adhesive. Use a scraper, filling knife or even putty knife to scrape it all off.
  4. Clean the surface
    To be sure your new tile properly adheres; you will need to at least dust off the surface.  At best, try to clean the surface with a damp cloth and some mild soap.  Wait until it is completely dry before moving to the next step.  Do not use a wet cloth!  Damp will pick up the dust; wet will get water under the adjacent tiles and cause a lot of issues later on.
  5. Add New Adhesive
    Use the trowel to apply the adhesive back onto the surface (just as the old stuff was.) The layer should be only about ¼ inch.
  6. Set the Tile
    Now place the new tile on top of the adhesive and press firmly in the middle, corners, and along the sides. Press many times and even wiggle the tile a little bit to be sure it is set firmly.
  7. Re-grout
    Now you can mix up your grout into the same paste consistency as the adhesive and use your grout float to smear it along the sides of the tile. Be sure the grout is getting into all of the seams around the tile – don’t leave gaps; fill up each seam completely!
  8. Clean up
    Final StepFinally, you can use your sponge and bucket of water to clean all of the excess grout off the surface of the tiles. The sponge should be damp enough to pick up excess grout, but NOT soaking wet enough to alter the consistency of the grout in the joint.
About these ads

Entry filed under: Budget Friendly, Economic, Featured, How-To. Tags: , , , , .

5 Tips For Choosing the Best Tile Flooring Option Lacava Sinks Put Elegant and Eco-friendly Designs to Work

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. MILESTONE MAN  |  May 15, 2011 at 12:51 pm

    Wise advice kind sage. There is nothing worse than a broken tile – MILESTONE MAN certainly knows this!!!

    Reply
  • 2. plumbtile  |  June 14, 2011 at 4:28 pm

    Well hopefully they will be a synch to replace with this! :) thanks for the comment.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Twitter Updates

  • How to Replace a Kitchen Faucet. On your own! bit.ly/1eRc9g1 4 hours ago
  • Hands-Free Faucets Optional manual control and new wireless technology make sensor-powered spigots kitchen-ready. bit.ly/1gAZ9vj 11 hours ago
  • At Plumbtile: Crossville is an elegant way to beautify your home. What's more, it's the most durable surfacing material you can choose... 23 hours ago

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 29 other followers

%d bloggers like this: